Integrated  Ruminant Nutrition
Nutritional Pointers

Kofasil®Life Contain homo LAB that are able to utilize wide range of sugars.
Also contain 2 strains of propionic acid bacteria
Lowers the pH value faster than any inactive inoculants presented in liquid or dry forms
Suitable for grass, legumes, bi-crops and low DM wholecrop 

"I have been using Kofasil life since 2006.  Its preparation is truly hassle-free. I have used Kofasil life on all sort of silage ranging from a very dry first cut to very wet second cut grass silage and the results have all been very good".
S. Nixon, Camerton, Wokington,

Kofasil®Life M
Contains Lactobacillus buchneri which speedily induces lactic acid fermentation whilst at the same time forming some acetic acid
Yeast and mould are effectively suppressed by the acetic acid thus ensuring an improvement in AEROBIC STABILITY.
Formation of acetic acid is limited to the minimum necessary so that there are no negative effects on the taste of the silage.
Suitable for maize silage, wholecrop silage and any high DM grass silage where there is a high risk of aerobic instability (heating up) at feedout.

“I am glad we used Kofasil. The alternative that was on offer would have cost us  3½    times more. There are no wastes at all, it keeps it cold and the cattle are doing extremely well”.
David Anderson
Maryport, Cumbria  

KOFASIL®DUO

Supplied As Freeze-Dried Ready-To-Use Premix

Contains:  
 The same unique strains of lactobacillus plantarum used in KOFASIL®LIFE and

The same strain of Lactobacillus buchneri used in KOFASIL®LIFE M

Attributes

1. Able to utilize wide range of sugars

2. Fast acidification  ensures an Improvement in Silage Feeding Value.

3. Yeast and mould are also effectively suppressed, thus ensuring an Improvement in Aerobic Stability at Feedout.

4. High osmotolerance makes it effective on high DM forages

Kofasil®Duo is Suitable for Grass, Wholecrop and Maize Silage

 "It kept the silage cold and we are very pleased with the results. The fact that our maize silage was 1st in the silage competition this year is a very good advert for KOFASIL. We are going to be using it again”.
Malcolm Cottam,
Holmrook, Cumbria

Nutrient requirement of growing dairy heifer

 

Calf

Replacement Heifer

(%  DM)

Conc.

3 to 6 mth

6 to 14 mth

15 to 24 mth

M/D MJ/kg DM

12.0-13.0

11.5

10.5-11

10-11

Crude Protein

18-22

17-18

14-16

14-16

DUP % CP

-

40

25

10-20

ERDP % CP

-

60

75

80-90

Starch

24

24

10-16

18-12

Sugar

6

6

4

6

NDF

25-35

35

40-50

40-60

Oil/Fat

4-7

3-7

2-5

2-5

Calcium

0.6

0.6

0.55

0.4

Phosphorus                                    

0.4

0.4

0.3

0.25

Magnesium

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

Forage NDF (% BW)

-

-

0.85

0.85-1

Note:

1.     Target a daily liveweight gain of 0.8 to 1.0 kg

2.      Depending on breed, target a bulling age of between 14 and 16 months (weight of between 340 to 380 kg). Ideally, a 15 month old heifer should be about 1 month in calf.

3.     Target a calving weight of 540 to 570 kg





Mineral requirement of dairy cow

 

Mineral

 

 

Lactating cow

 

Dry pregnant cow

 

 

Heifer

Calcium

%

0.67

0.44

0.41

Phosphorus

%

0.36

0.22

0.28

Magnesium

%

0.20

0.11

0.11

Potassium

%

1.06

0.51

0.47

Sodium

%

0.22

0.10

0.08

Chlorine

%

0.28

0.13

0.11

Sulphur

%

0.20

0.20

0.20

Iron

mg/kg

12-18

13

43

Copper

mg/kg

11-13

12

9-10

Zinc

mg/kg

43-55

21

32

Manganese

mg/kg

13-14

16

22

Iodine

mg/kg

0.4-0.6

0.40

0.30

Cobalt

mg/kg

0.11

0.11

0.11

Selenium

mg/kg

0.30

0.30

0.30

Data from NRC 2001;

1.     Macro minerals for lactating cows  based on 680kg cow producing 45L of milk with 3.5 % fat

2.     Dry cows requirements based on 240 days pregnant

3.     Heifer that is from 6 months old

































Nutrient requirement of growing dairy heifer

 

Calf

Replacement Heifer

(%  DM)

Conc.

3 to 6 mth

6 to 14 mth

15 to 24 mth

M/D MJ/kg DM

12.0-13.0

11.5

10.5-11

10-11

Crude Protein

18-22

17-18

14-16

14-16

DUP % CP

-

40

25

10-20

ERDP % CP

-

60

75

80-90

Starch

24

24

10-16

18-12

Sugar

6

6

4

6

NDF

25-35

35

40-50

40-60

Oil/Fat

4-7

3-7

2-5

2-5

Calcium

0.6

0.6

0.55

0.4

Phosphorus                                    

0.4

0.4

0.3

0.25

Magnesium

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

Forage NDF (% BW)

-

-

0.85

0.85-1

Note:

1.     Target a daily liveweight gain of 0.8 to 1.0 kg

2.      Depending on breed, target a bulling age of between 14 and 16 months (weight of between 340 to 380 kg). Ideally, a 15 month old heifer should be about 1 month in calf.

3.     Target a calving weight of 540 to 570 kg


Mineral requirement of dairy cow

 

Mineral

 

 

Lactating cow

 

Dry pregnant cow

 

 

Heifer

Calcium

%

0.67

0.44

0.41

Phosphorus

%

0.36

0.22

0.28

Magnesium

%

0.20

0.11

0.11

Potassium

%

1.06

0.51

0.47

Sodium

%

0.22

0.10

0.08

Chlorine

%

0.28

0.13

0.11

Sulphur

%

0.20

0.20

0.20

Iron

mg/kg

12-18

13

43

Copper

mg/kg

11-13

12

9-10

Zinc

mg/kg

43-55

21

32

Manganese

mg/kg

13-14

16

22

Iodine

mg/kg

0.4-0.6

0.40

0.30

Cobalt

mg/kg

0.11

0.11

0.11

Selenium

mg/kg

0.30

0.30

0.30

Data from NRC 2001;

1.     Macro minerals for lactating cows  based on 680kg cow producing 45L of milk with 3.5 % fat

2.     Dry cows requirements based on 240 days pregnant

3.     Heifer that is from 6 months old


























            

Milk Vs blood urea level

 

Milk (mg/L)

Blood (mM/L)

Low

150-236

2.9-4.5

Normal

258-345

4.9-6.6

High

365-451

7.0-8.6

Note:  Milk urea values of less than 250 mg/L and greater than 350 mg/L can reflect poor milk production and health effect.

Milk  urea value greater than 425 mg/L have been associated with significantly lower conception rates (Butler et al., 1996)

Relative availabilities of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and sulphur from common feed sources.

Relative
Availability

Calcium

Phosphorus

Magnesium

Sulphur

High

Steamed bone meal

Monocalcium phosphate

Magnesium oxide

Calcium sulphate

 

Monocalcium phosphate

Monosodium phosphate

Magnesium sulphate

Sodium sulphate

 

Dicalcium phosphate

Ammonium phosphate

Magnesium carbonate

Potassium sulphate

 

Calcium chloride

Dicalcium phosphate

 

Magnesium sulphate

Medium

Calcium carbonate

Steamed bone meal

Magnesium chloride

 

 

Limestone

Defluorinated phosphate

 

 

 

 

Sodium tripolyphosphate

 

 

Low

Forages

Low fluorine rock phosphate

Forages, grains

Elemental sulphur

 

Dolomitic limestone

Soft rock phosphate

 

 

Note: Biological availability defines how much of the mineral is available for the role it was fed and it is by far more important than the total level of  the individual the minerals in the feed.

Information from NRC (1989); Chase, L.E. and C.J. Sniffen. 1982. Minerals in Dairy Cattle Nutrition. Regional Feed Dealer Seminars. Cornell Univ., USA.